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The Manual Interviews Motorbike Mondays

TheManual_Interview

 

The Manual Interviews Motorbike Mondays

Andrew Couts, Features Editor of Digital Trends, and Staff Writer at The Manual recently interviewed Brady, Jarred and I (Evan) at Motorbike Mondays.  Head on over to the website for the interview HERE. I’ll post an excerpt of it below:

Any man who spends most of his days behind a desk, basking in the harsh glow of a computer screen has dreamt of abandoning it all for something a bit more hands-on – like, say, building custom motorcycles. But the guys behind Motorbike Mondays, an excellent weekly podcast that helps average Joes build their dream bikes, are already living that dream. We got in touch with the Motorbike Mondays crew – designer and electrical engineer for RaceTech Electric Evan Grist, andSeaweed & Gravel custom bike builders Brady Young and Jarred DeArmas – to get their take on custom builds, podcasting, and what it’s like to live on the other side of the wall.

The Manual: How did you get started building motorcycles?

Evan Grist (pictured left): While I’ve built plenty of my own bikes, and designed and performed countless modifications for customers, I don’t really ‘build’ motorcycles. I’m an electrical engineer, and I focus on designing and developing electrical parts for motorcycles. I specialize on motorcycle charging and ignition systems, custom wiring harnesses, and gauges/meters/computers, switches and lights. I got my start in motorcycles when I was 21, with a $300 Craigslist special 1974 Suzuki TS125. After my first ride and crash on this bike in the desert trails East of San Diego, I was hooked for life on not only riding, but fixing, customizing and improving my bikes.

Brady Young: What started it was a run down ’71 Yamaha CT175. It was my good friend’s brother’s first dirt bike, and abandoned after he got a new one. What started as an innocent chop and see what happens idea quickly escalated into an everyday-after-work project. We sourced an XS650 motor and managed to squeeze it into the tiny frame, little by little building a new frame around it. Long story short, it was a wonderful failure. But I had lost my virginity and made enough mistakes needed to get me going in the right direction.

Jarred DeArmas: … I had always liked motorcycles as a kid, but my parents wouldn’t let me ride one, so I decided that if I bought an old Honda that obviously wasn’t running, with the intent to fix it up and make it run, that would be ok with my parents … it wasn’t. Haha. But they let me get a scooter. I was super into cafe bikes, and on my next tour with the band, I browsed Craigslist in every state looking for the perfect buy. I found a 1976 CB550 in Sacramento on the third-to-last day of tour and bought it for 300 bucks. I threw it in the trailer and brought it home and worked on it in my friend’s garage. I ended up telling my parents, and once they realized I was really into it and that the bike probably would never run, they were cool with it.

Check out The Manual for the whole interview!

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